The Lake Superior coastline is rugged, wild, and notorious for shipwrecks that attest to the combined dangers of water, wind, and waves. Until recently, the 185-mile (300-km) section of shoreline from the Huron Islands to Whitefish Point was without any modern offshore equipment to provide critical coastal storm data such as wave height and water temperature.

In 2014, Northern Michigan University – in cooperation with LimnoTech and the Superior Watershed Partnership – received funding from the Great Lakes Observing System  to deploy a number of coastal storm buoys along the southeastern shoreline of Lake Superior. The three buoys are located 5-10 miles offshore of Marquette, Munising, and Grand Marais, providing real-time wave height, water temperature, and meteorological data.

 

GRANITE ISLAND BUOY

Buoy data not available. Buoy camera is offline.
  

MUNISING BUOY

Buoy data not available. Buoy camera is offline.
  

GRAND MARAIS BUOY

Buoy data not available. Buoy camera is offline.
  

STANNARD ROCK LIGHTHOUSE

October 17, 2018 1:00 pm EDT
Location: 47.184N 87.225W
Wind Direction: NW (320°)
Wind Speed: 31.1 knots
Wind Gust: 35.0 knots
Atmospheric Pressure: 30.15 in (1020.9 mb)
Pressure Tendency: +0.12 in (+3.9 mb)
Air Temperature: 34.0°F (1.1°C)
Dew Point: 20.8°F (-6.2°C)
Buoy camera is offline.